Marc Antony’s Helmet

Computer renderings:
























Photographs of completed helmet, 3D printed via laser-sintered stainless steel, with some elements gold-plated. The gemstones are laser-cured resin 3D prints:

The Dancing Faun of Pompeii in Power and Pathos

The lines are drawn, the orders are in,
The Dance Commander’s ready to sin.
Radio message from HQ;
Dance Commander, we love you.

—Electric Six, Dance Commander

The New York Times calls the J. Paul Getty Museum’s current exhibit of 40 ancient bronzes, Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World “one of the best exhibitions of sculpture you may ever see.”

For the Los Angeles leg of its tour, the exhibit featured the life-size Seated Boxer. But when it came time for the exhibit to move to Washington, D.C., the Vatican recalled the Boxer to Rome, so it could be displayed in conjunction with 2016 Jubilee festivities.

The Getty curators filled the Boxer’s vacancy with the Dancing Faun of Pompeii, which was loaned from the Naples Archaeological Museum.

Judging from press accounts, the Faun has stolen the show. That should come as no surprise, though.

The Dancing Faun was discovered on October 26, 1830 in the ruins of the most opulent Roman home discovered at Pompeii: the House of the Faun, as it later became known, which was also home to the Alexander Mosaic. The Faun is thought to be either a 2nd-century Greek original, or a very high-quality Roman copy.

Upon its discovery, as Francis Haskell and Nicholas Penny write in Taste and the Antique, “The fame of this small bronze was instantaneous … its first cataloger described it as the finest bronze to have been excavated at Pompeii and compared it to the Barberini Faun.

Its small size made it ideal for reproduction and for decorating gardens and drawing rooms. Victorians raved about the Faun, no doubt with assurances like that from the Naples museum, which advised that “the Faun was ecstatic and not in the intoxicated condition of various other bronze Fauns from Herculaneum and Pompeii…”

Dancing Faun of Pompeii plaster cast, photo by CosmoWenmanThe timeless, enthusiastic response to the Faun in the Power and Pathos exhibit is great. And the public’s impulse to collect a copy for themselves can live on too: in 2013 I laser scanned a 19th-century plaster cast of the Faun at the Skulpturhalle Basel museum.

I’ve used that 3D data to make 3D printed gold, silver, bronze, brass, and steel pendants, which you can buy here: http://etsy.me/1MLIzsY

More importantly, though, I’ve made the data freely available to anyone, with no restrictions on its use. Click here to download the 3D-printable files: thingiverse.com/thing:196048

Here’s a sampling of what people have done with the data in the year since I shared it: http://bit.ly/1OqY6y5

Click here for an orientable, zoomable 3D viewer of the Faun data: https://skfb.ly/JFBL

 

3D printed pendants of the Dancing Faun of Pompeii: http://etsy.me/1MLIzsY

20151229 DancingFaun_3D scan by CosmoWenman

Click to open 3D viewer of Dancing Faun 3D model: https://skfb.ly/JFBL

 

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1944 US Army Intelligence Report by Boris Krass

My grandfather, Boris Krass, was born in Russia, and while still very young spent 5 or 6 years years as a refugee in Germany with other White Russian families before coming to the US.

Fluent in English, Russian, and German, he was an intelligence officer in the US Army during WWII. In 1944 he interrogated hundreds of Russian forced-labor prisoners that the Allies had liberated from the Nazis.

This is a report he made to the Army and OSS about their situation:
https://cosmowenman.files.wordpress.com/…/1994-11-25-intelli…

Highlights:

“Bombings and black markets afford the only source of extra food.”

“If an Osterbeiter is … caught walking with a German girl, he is hanged the next day.”

“By far the great majority of Russians have nothing but hate for the Nazis”

“Incidents of sabotage, killing, plots, and secret organizations have been cited to this interrogator.”

“Several Ost workers have reported that they had been carefully approached by Germans, self-styled Anti-Nazis, who have invited them to listen to Allied broadcasts in the secrecy of their homes.”

“many of the Russian girls working as domestic servants in private homes listen to the radio in the absence of their employers. The subject matter of these broadcasts is then widely disseminated among other Russian laborers.”

Still-captive Russian prisoners want guidance on:

– Should we resist evacuations, and hide to await the Americans?

– How can we fight the Nazis at the critical moment? Sabotage? Passive resistance? Arms? Open revolt?

– How should we act during an air-raid?

“It is beyond the scope of this report to deal with the delicate question of why the Soviet Union has left much to be desired in sending propaganda to its citizens in Germany. It is presumed to be a matter of politics.”

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